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Thread: MOA - Minutes Of Angle

  1. #11
    A lot of seasoned shooters that used optics for years are totally unaware of parallax correction. Another note to keep in mind is, on an adjustable objective scope, the scope manufacturers like to engrave yardages on the bell. Well, nine chances out of ten, they are not right. They are close, but still need checked to correct parallax.

  2. #12
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    Mike, it's not the air resistance that's causing the loss of the bullet's speed and thereby it dropping to the lower part of the target. It's gravity. The time the bullet spends "flying", e.g., from the time it leaves the muzzle to the time it impacts the target, is the time that gravity will act downwards on the bullet. If you break down the problem to Physics, you have a forward motion caused by the gun powder buring and creating pressure to push the bullet down and out of the barrel. But once out, you have another force and that's gravity.

    So to answer your question, in vacuum with zero gravity, the bullet would travel completey straight with no drop. With both a vacuum and gravity, it would drop less. This is due to a vacuum and no air resistance so the time of flight is shorter than if air resistance was present. By shortening flight time of the bullet you "expose" it to a shorter duration of gravity and the drop would be less.
    f/8 and be there!

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by MKW View Post
    Mike, it's not the air resistance that's causing the loss of the bullet's speed and thereby it dropping to the lower part of the target. It's gravity.
    I agree with much of what you've written, but I disagree with the above. Gravity will certainly do its thing, and the bullet will fall at pretty much the same rate regardless of other factors. The only thing that will slow the bullet down though, is air resistance. Gravity will pull the bullet down, but will not slow down the speed.

    If you watch the full video, you'll see that one of the reasons why the bullet will hit the target lower than expected is because of the decreased speed of the bullet as it flies through the air.

    (To exaggerate, think of the bullet as being fired under water.)


    The way I see it, a bullet fired in a vacuum would hit the target higher than a bullet fired normally, because there wouldn't be any air resistance to slow it down. Since the bullet falls at the same rate, the longer it takes the bullet to hit the target, the less it will fall. A bullet fired at the speed of light (more imaginative examples...) would not seem to drop at all at any distance. (Think of a laser beam.)

  4. #14
    ekliu
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    There's an awful lot of science going on here.

    It's definitely air resistance that is slowing bullets down. Bullet aerodynamics are a huge part of accurate long range shooting.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post
    I agree with much of what you've written, but I disagree with the above. Gravity will certainly do its thing, and the bullet will fall at pretty much the same rate regardless of other factors. The only thing that will slow the bullet down though, is air resistance. Gravity will pull the bullet down, but will not slow down the speed.

    If you watch the full video, you'll see that one of the reasons why the bullet will hit the target lower than expected is because of the decreased speed of the bullet as it flies through the air.

    (To exaggerate, think of the bullet as being fired under water.)


    The way I see it, a bullet fired in a vacuum would hit the target higher than a bullet fired normally, because there wouldn't be any air resistance to slow it down. Since the bullet falls at the same rate, the longer it takes the bullet to hit the target, the less it will fall. A bullet fired at the speed of light (more imaginative examples...) would not seem to drop at all at any distance. (Think of a laser beam.)
    Geez, what the hell was I typing??? Now that I re-read what I typed those two quoted sentences contradict each other! What I was trying to say is that it's not the slowing down of the bullet that is causing the drop. So a better sentence to replace the first quoted sentence woudl be:

    "Air resistance slows the bullet down but it is not the slowing down that is causing the drop of the bullet."
    f/8 and be there!

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