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Thread: Great Lakes Challenge on-road Nitro Race, 2011

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    Great Lakes Challenge on-road Nitro Race, 2011

    The dates for the 2011 GLC are August 24 - 25 (open for practice) and racing on August 26, 27, 28.

    Information is posted on the website for all events at www.racersoftoledo.com . There are plenty of race dates in the Midwest area, and the Toledo club works the club schedule around the Midwest Series.

    Brian Berry should have the entry forms for the GLC posted on the website in just a few days. Check here "http://www.racersoftoledo.com/2009events.html" for the latest news.

    People mostly fly into Detroit (DTW) which is about an hour away and most likely cheapest. A closer airport is Toledo Express (TOL) which is about 35min away. Toledo is a good airport to consider - it's a smaller airport and no crazy lines getting through security.

    2010 Race:


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    Satellite view of Woodville Mall and the GLC Track

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  4. #4

    Pat Kayser Memorial Top Speed Awards

    As is done every year, the Pat Kayser Memorial Top Speed Awards will be given out at the 2011 Great Lakes Challenge. The Toledo club continues to memorialize Pat, who passed away in 2000. Pat was a club member who put a lot of extra time and effort into the club. Among the many things he has done for the club, the most outstanding was as the designer and webmaster for the club website. Pat was always bragging about how fast his car was on the straightaway.

    So the club decided to present a "Pat Kayser Memorial Top Speed Run Award". The premise was that a radar gun would be used during the warm-ups for one of the qualifiers. To do something just a little bit different (Pat would have loved this!) the club awarded towels with the Great Lakes outline, printed with the name of the award, location and date. This year, the awards will be for:
    • 1/8 GT (last year's speed, 53.5mph by Marty Waldhelm)
    • 1/10 TC - (last year's speed, 62.7mph by Vincent Jackson)
    • 1/8 Masters - (last year's speed, 64.4mph by Darrell Scott)
    • 1/8 4WD - (last year's speed 66.4mph by Mike Keely)

    It will be interesting to see if any of these records will be broken!

  5. #5

    2011 Great Lakes Challenge – Thursday

    Once again, late August means it’s time for the Great Lakes Challenge, an annual on-road fuel R/C car race held at the Toledo 1/8 Racers’ club track. This is one of the finest tracks in the USA, with an enthusiastic group of local racers who are constantly working on maintaining and improving things. The race is hosted by the One Eight Racers of Toledo.

    The GLC is not a national or international points race, or any other kind of “official” championship. What it is, is a fun event where racers from all across the country to come and enjoy themselves at their hobby. The whole event is “low key”. The entry fee was only $40, there’s lots of time for practice, and there’s a total of five rounds of qualifying, plus long mains to ensure that all racers get in lots of track time.

    With the event being billed as a “fun race”, there was no lack of support. Sponsors include Capricorn, Byron Fuel, Novarossi, Team Shepherd America, Kyosho, PowerMaster Fuel, Starting Grid, Mugen Seiki, CEFX, Contact Tres, Ipanema Sports, OS Engines, RC America, Skyrocket Racing, Kosmic RC Fuel, Futaba, XRAY, Tornado Fuel, Sweep, EDSTools, KO Propo, and YBSlow Inc.

    The classes change over the years, depending on what racers are interested in. For 2011 there are four classes, 1/10 sedan, 1/8 Masters, 1/8 Open, and GT (1/8 off-road cars modified to race on-road). There is talk of reviving a pan-car class if enough racers are interested.

    The track is a permanent track, 230 feet long by 110 feet deep, with freshly sealed asphalt occupying a corner of a large parking lot behind one of the local shopping malls. Over the years, the track has grown, and improved by adding things that racers need. There is lots of covered pit space, a large (and suitably tall) driver’s stand, boards loosely held in place, along with nylon bumpers and “flappers” (to minimize broken parts from errant race cars). There is plenty of room for pitting. The club also provides a tire-trueing area, a car-cleaning area, and a tech inspection area where racers can verify that their cars are “legal”. In addition to the typical “tent city”, the club has built some steel frame structures to pit under.

    The official race schedule starts on Thursday for practice (but those who arrive earlier are welcome to practice as much as they wish). Friday morning is more practice, with two rounds of qualifying being held in the afternoon. Saturday there are three more rounds of qualifying, for a total of five rounds. The main events are held on Sunday. As of Thursday, there are 118 racers signed up for the event.

    As the clock ticked down to the start of the event, an ugly hurricane was hurtling up aimed at the East coast of the USA, but is not expected to have much of an effect on the Toledo area. Several racers were glad to be out of the path of the hurricane, but still concerned with what might happen to their homes. As this is being written, the hurricane is expected to come up the Eastern coast of the USA, but nobody knows exactly where it will hit.

    Thursday’s practice session got underway mid-morning. The track had been washed down the night before from a heavy rain, and it took a while to fully dry off. Ted Hammer applied the mystery goo (traction compound) to the track, and around 10am or so, cars started going out for practice. The track improved as more and more cars got to run on it. By noon, the open practice session was split into alternating sessions for each scale, 1/10, and 1/8. Around 3pm sign-up started. Transponder numbers were checked, and each racer was given a bright yellow T-Shirt. Racers who signed up early got in for the very low entrance fee. Those who waited until the last minute had to cover a late entry fee. It’s always least expensive to sign up early.

    Just about all brands of cars are represented in this year’s GLC. There’s Mugen, Shepherd, Kyosho, Serpent, Motonica, Capricorn, X-Ray, and even a Delta! It’s all low-key though. The “teams” are more so just a bunch of racers with a similar car, helping each other out. As to the racers, there are lots of “hot shots” who do so well nowadays, but there’s a much larger number of ordinary hobbyists, who would normally show up only for a club race. They come to the GLC because it’s the type of event that makes everyone feel welcome!

    Thursday’s practice continued into the early evening. It’s a big, wide track, with lots of room, and the driver’s stand allow for a large number of drivers to run simultaneously. Practice continues Friday morning, which is good for those racers who couldn’t arrive before then.


    Thursday's Photos















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    (Note - to see the larger views of the photos, scroll down to the bottom of your browser page, and at the left side of the screen change the "style" setting from "default" to "photography". This will change the background color to black, and show the images 1200 pixels wide rather than only 800.)

  7. #7

    2011 Great Lakes Challenge – Thursday

    Lots more racers arrived in Toledo, as the parking lot at the GLC grew substantially more crowded. The race is limited to a maximum of 16 mains – if additional racers continue to show up, the race may “fill up”.

    Friday’s weather was absolutely perfect for R/C racing. Clear, sunny, with a Kodak Blue sky, not too hot, and a nice breeze to keep all of us comfortable. The morning started out with practice, which continued until around noon. That’s when the drivers meeting was held, along with everyone gathering for a group photo. Shortly afterwards, the first of Friday’s two rounds of qualifying started. It turned out to be a pleasant, relaxing afternoon of car racing, with no “urgency” in the schedule. Events went on in order, but with no pushing to maintain any kind of schedule. As always, there were racers who were quite pleased with how they did, and others who left the track thinking “if only…”.


    The following is what I hope is a nearly full set of racer photos from this year's GLC – Here’s a link to it:

    http://www.sgrid.com/forum/showthrea...akes-Challenge

    (Feel free to use these images for your avatars, facebook pages, or whatever....)




    Qualifying standings, first three in each class at the end of two rounds of qualifying:
    1/8 Open
    1 – Scott Kimbrow
    2 – Paolo Morganti
    3 – Paul Lemieux

    1/10 Touring Open
    1 – Paul Lemieux
    2 – Vincent Jackson
    3 – Andy Power

    1/8 Masters
    1 – Eli Ezrow
    2 – Bob Block
    3 – Mark Sweeney

    1/8 GT
    1 – Rick Vessel
    2 – Scott McNish
    3 – Bill Sydor

    PHOTOS (To see larger photos, select the "photography" style at the bottom left of this forum page.)








































  8. #8

    2011 Great Lakes Challenge – Saturday

    Saturday was the final day of qualifying. The first round was held early in the morning, after which the heats were re-seeded based on qualifying order. Qualifying continued through the day. Everything went smoothly. With the racers pit areas sort of wrapped around the race track, and a good sound system, everyone was aware of what was going on, so no time was lost waiting for people who “didn’t get the word”. The weather remained warm and sunny for most of the day, eventually getting a bit cloudy towards the end. There was always a constant breeze, keeping everyone comfortable.

    Despite Toledo's “moveable boards”, which move around when hit, some racers managed to break some car parts anyway, but for the most part, the damage was mostly to the racer’s pride. The “flagless start” (invented by the Toledo club!) certainly did its part. There is a countdown for several minutes, and when it reaches "zerro" the individual racer's clocks are able to start. Cars start out whenever they want, spacing themselves out around the track, and each racer’s “clock” starts when his car passed over the line. This means dreaded “turn-one-pileups” are now a thing of the past. Another change over the years is almost complete – hardly any racers used crystal-based radios. The radio impound boxes still exist up on the driver’s stand, but thanks to the new DSM technology, radio impound is rapidly becoming as extinct as 8-track audio tapes.

    (A rumor going around the track is that next year there will once again be a pan car class. A lot of people are looking forward to that – the price of competition will drop dramatically. Nobody has said anything officially yet, but with the Toledo club being so open to new ideas, if enough racers get involved, this is sure to happen. Check next year's race report to see if this actually happens......)

    As I walked around the track and watched the races, I found that in many ways, nothing ever changes in R/C racing. I saw Paolo Morganti helping out another driver earlier in the week by checking the setup on a car. Paolo took the car out for a test, and the car appeared flawless. Without pushing the car, and looking as smooth as Art Carbonell, Paolo just went around the track as if there was a hidden guide-track buried in the asphalt. The car was “planted”, and looked very smooth as it went around. Paolo is quite good, and watching him, he appeared to be just out for a relaxing drive, enjoying himself. Then, after a tank of fuel, Paolo stopped and the car’s owner took over. Paolo walked away, then turned to watch…. I was watching too, and the car suddenly seemed to have a mind of its own. It was erratic, darting here and there, and while it “looked” faster, the lap times would have shown just the opposite. Paolo’s next words were “What are you doing???”. He probably needn’t have bothered. That ancient line “slower is faster” is just as true today as ever, but so few racers seem to accept it. The harder they try to go faster, the slower they get. If they would take a deep breath, and concentrate on being smooth, not fast, their lap times would improve, not to mention tires lasting longer, fewer broken parts, and less wear and tear on all the parts. I guess when a car has lots of horsepower, the tendency is to use it all the time. A better choice would be to back off, and concentrate on driving on the right line. One example was Mike Saputo, in the last qualifier in the event. Until then, Mike’s car was all over the track, overdriving the turns, and causing the boards to jump out in front of the car. For the last run, Mike just took it easy, followed a smooth, flowing line, and did much, much better. OK, end of soapbox speech… :-)

    Qualifying is completed, and the mains are set to run Sunday. Photos and a video will be posted to this thread in an hour or so....

    Here’s the qualifying order for the top ten cars in each class:

    1/8 Open
    Scott Kimbrow
    Paolo Morganti
    Terry Rott
    Jeff Zuccarell
    Paul Lemieux
    Lon Burling II
    Richard Siriano
    Jari Taskila
    Andrew Nicholas
    Michael Palazzola

    1/10 Touring Open
    Paul Lemieux
    Vincent Jackson
    DJ Apolaro
    Andy Power
    Craig Xavier
    Melvin Austin
    Scott Fisher
    Troy Woodson
    Brad Toffelmire
    Louis Vanderway

    1/8 Masters
    Joaquin DeSoto Sr.
    Eli Ezrow
    David Lee
    Mark Sweeney
    Skip Starkey
    Don Jones
    Rick Davis
    Bob Block
    Dan Louis
    Jeff Whiting

    1/8 GT
    Rick Vessel
    Scott McNish
    Mike Cooper
    Bill Sydor
    Marty Waldhelm
    Mark Rodney
    Gene Greer
    Dave Strausbaugh
    Gary Waldhelm
    James Palensky

  9. #9

    Pat Kayser Memorial Top Speed Awards, 2011

    As is done every year, the Pat Kayser Memorial Top Speed Awards were given out at the 2011 Great Lakes Challenge. The Toledo club continues to memorialize Pat, who passed away in 2000. Pat was a club member who put a lot of extra time and effort into the club. Among the many things he has done for the club, the most outstanding was as the designer and webmaster for the club website. Pat was always bragging about how fast his car was on the straightaway.

    So the club decided to present a "Pat Kayser Memorial Top Speed Run Award". The premise was that a radar gun would be used during the warm-ups for one of the qualifiers. To do something just a little bit different (Pat would have loved this!) the club awarded towels with the Great Lakes outline, printed with the name of the award, location and date. This year, all the top speeds increased over last year's speeds:

    1/8 GT (last year's speed, 53.5mph by Marty Waldhelm) 1/8 GT – Scott McNish, 52.6 mph
    1/10 TC - (last year's speed, 62.7mph by Vincent Jackson) 1/10 TC – D.J. Apolaro, 63.1 mph
    1/8 Masters - (last year's speed, 64.4mph by Darrell Scott) 1/8 Masters – Mike Richey, 64.5 mph
    1/8 4WD - (last year's speed 66.4mph by Mike Keely) 1/8 4WD Open – Jeff Zuccarell, 66.6 mph











    Left to right: Jeff Zuccarrell, Mike Richey, Scott McNish, DJ Apolaro

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    GLC Saturday Photos






















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